Flash Back Fridays

VICTORIA COLONIST, June 21st, 1974 Letter to the Editor by Gorde Hunter

At hand, a letter wanting to know why the government is planning to send 420 school teachers to Strathcona Park Lodge for a one-week course on nature study, alpine climbing, outdoor survival, etc. – at taxpayer’s expense. The Lodge, as I under- stand it, is owned by some school teachers from the Campbell River area. Again, why the expense-paid holiday?

TEACHERS OUTDOOR ENVIRONMENT COURSES 1974

For teachers hard-pressed to tell the difference between a beech and a birch, the Department of Education is funding a series of special courses this summer. “This will be an experiential program and after six days the teachers will feel they have been here for six months” says center director, Jim Boulding. “They will go away from the center much more mature and able to handle most situations in the outdoors. But it won’t be a holiday.”

The project is being conducted in co-operation with the University of B.C.’s Center for Continuing Education, the B.C. Teachers Federation and Simon Fraser University. Eight environmental education courses are being offered and some will be repeated.

The courses will cover a variety of subjects, including survival in the wilderness, water safety, ecology, biology, West Coast Indians, art, sculpture and weaving. There will also be a course designed to enable teachers to prepare themselves for safe leadership of school children in mountains and on lakes and rivers. Guest speakers will include writer and conservationist Roderick Haig-Brown.

(top row) Jim Rutter on far left and Ray Preece on far right (middle row) Jim Force third from left and Geoff Evans on far right (bottom row) Patty & Bruce Kiloh—second and third from left—and Jim with Josie on right

(top row) Jim Rutter on far left and Ray Preece on far right
(middle row) Jim Force third from left and Geoff Evans on far right
(bottom row) Patty & Bruce Kiloh—second and third from left—and Jim with Josie on right

SURPRISES FOR TEACHERS
Humphrey Davy (Times Staff), Environment Program, Aug. 1974
Some 25 Victoria teachers returned last week from a rigorous outdoors pro- gram, hopeful they can enlighten their students on the intricacies of the environment. For some teachers it was the first time they had ever been in a kayak, a canoe, walked on an alpine plateau, or fended for themselves on wilderness beaches on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The project ran into some problems according to assistant director Ray Preece. “Some teachers were extremely fit and others were not,” he said. “So I had to change the course a bit to take in the two groups.”
Instructors were some of the province’s top experts on outdoor education and environment, included Geoff Evans, a former director of Outward Bound, Brian Creer, director of Canoe Sport-B.C., and Alice Culbert, a top B.C. mountaineer. Others in- clude Roderick Haig Brown, author and conservationist, George Clutesi, Indian artist and writer, Kate Bloomfield, Victoria artist, and Paul Presidente, of the Fish and Wildlife Branch.