Tag Archives: Dave Boulding

Flash Back Fridays

JIM TEACHES ME HOW TO DO A BOG WALK: 1973

A story by David Boulding

After I had been on bog walks with the handsome Harvard graduate, Paul Bragstad, the nebbish New Yorker, Mike Rewald and the famous flower photographer, Ian Forbes, Jim decided I was ready to do bog walks.

One frosty spring day Jim and I went off in the 16 foot aluminum boat loaded with the 070 Stihl saw, the yellow Gilchrist hand logging jack, peaveys, cables, ropes, pry bars and shovels. Some where south of the Lodge we beached and began the laborious process of borrowing large beautiful Douglas fir trees.

Most of the trees were close to the water and adroit falling by Jim would have them in the lake. Once floating, they were mine to tow home with a 25 horse power Johnson Sea Horse. However, sometimes to get them floating required hours of Egyptian slave style efforts.

Here, I was introduced to the B.C. coastal torture device: the Gilchrist hand logging jack. With this jack, I got to play Eratosthenes, the Greek mathematician who said given a lever long enough he could move the world. We rolled logs with the jack and put them in the water. Some logs were over six feet at the butt. Jim showed me how to operate the jack. From then on, he would tell me what to do as he sat there talking.

Jim Boulding

Jim Boulding

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Flash Back Fridays

BUILDING THE BARN: 1977 A story by David Boulding

Dave Boulding standing like Ken Dryden, Montreal Candains goaltender.

Dave Boulding standing like Ken Dryden, Montreal Candains goaltender.

The barn was built for the same reason the Haig Brown and the outdoor centre were built. Jim wanted a maintenance shop. His plans for a shop on the far northern side of the property were changed by the fire in May 1973 and the Haig Brown building soon after construction began morphed in an accommodation building.

The barn was going to be different.

It began as a residence for Adrian Koeleman the mechanic. Originally there were to be eight-foot foundation walls as the building’s basement was to be Adrian’s residence, but when Jim found out the cost of cement it was decided they would be much shorter.

The government had a program called NEEDS which was designed to give employment to those workers had had no more UIC (Unemployment Insurance, now referred to as EI) eligibility. Local Campbell River businesses could apply for various NEED grants, and get work at UIC rates and the weeks on the program were counted as “insurable weeks” for purposes of claiming more UIC. Jim applied for a grant and employed over 75 people through this program, a few of which were Vietnamese fishermen. Read more