Tag Archives: David Boulding

Flash Back Fridays

TV COMMERCIALS AND CHEVAIS REGAL: 1974 A story by David Boulding

In the winter, it was grim. Cold and dark, with little money, Jim Krieger, Roger Podolski and Heidi Caflisch would save beer bottles, pop bottles and bits of money to buy a bottle of the best scotch sold in Campbell River. A bottle would last weeks. For entertainment, we would assemble in old cabin 21, the old guide shack, and do T.V. commercials for each other. Obviously we had no TV or even a radio, which was heard only when driving to town, past the Strathcona dam.

Roger started by taking a cardboard box and cutting one side so a person could sit down behind Heidi’s small table and put his head on the table. His head was framed much like the old black and white televisions. After the airtight stove was roaring hot and everyone was comfy, Roger would do hemorrhoid commercials, car commercials, anything that popped into his mind.

Michael and the Italian army at Marble Meadows

Michael and the Italian army at Marble Meadows

He would challenge everyone to top his performances. These sessions went on for hours, and a fair minded eye witness would think we were all drunk. I did not drink; neither did Annie Boulding or Toby Hay. Jim Nelson, Heidi and Krieger would have a small glass and they would sip their beloved scotch all night. Krieger refused to drink the cheap stuff.

As laughter is contagious, each commercial would be funnier than the one before. The evening’s entertainment was cheap. No one got drunk because no one had enough money to buy sufficient alcohol. Later, when we could not even afford scotch, we would gather around the Franklin stove and watch the fire burn and talk (Toby says we mostly told lies). Toby is, as usual, correct. Jim got the crazy idea he could heat the buildings with big stoves. So, always thinking, he bought cheap, a 48 inch diameter piece of stainless steel, ten feet long from the scrap metal department of the local pulp mill. He took the pipe to Denis of York Machinery. He asked Denis to make him two stoves Based on a simple plan from Jim. The two stoves were similar, but had different front door systems. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

THE FIRE: 1973

A story by David Boulding

The Lodge burned down May 23rd, 1973. The fire started after lunch and the building was completely finished by 3 pm. There were few people on property and nothing could be done except save some stuff and prevent other buildings from burning.

Jim, Myrna, and the kids: Jamie, Elizabeth, and Annie were in town. Jim and Myrna raced back to find all they owned burned to the ground. Tears were the common reaction. Jim Boulding’s suspicion that students smoking in the attic room near the crawl space started the fire had a rational basis because the only other possible reason for the fire was faulty wiring and there was no wiring close to the scene. Jim Denis, a contractor from town, was completing some renovations to the kitchen and north wing of the Lodge. I remember there being fewer than 10 people here on the property, although many people driving by stopped and helped.

And some helped themselves to some of the valuables: native baskets and carvings and even an old wagon wheel we saved from the fire.

The chimney after the fire of 1973

The chimney after the fire of 1973

The fire was so hot the Chevron gas station sign, a plastic four foot square sign, melted and buckled high atop a 30 foot steel pole about 50 feet from the building.

I remember Jade Chua from the kitchen being the hero. She was a UBC student from Hong Kong, working to pay for her university expenses. She was about five foot nothing, square-shouldered, and a solid muscular young 20 some- thing woman. Her heroism was visible twice. Some days earlier Jim Denis had taken out the big Garland cooking stove to clean it and make some changes to the gas fittings as the stove was being located farther north in the kitchen. It took four men to move the stove back into the kitchen, and the doorway trim had to be removed, as the stove was wider than the opening. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

Roderrick Haig-Brown – 1970 A story by David Boulding

Roderick Haig-Brown

Roderick Haig-Brown

Jim was an avid fly fisher. His great relief was to go to the mouth of the Elk River (across from the Lodge) or to the drowned mouth of the Wolf River (a few miles from the Lodge) with his friend and mentor, Roderick Haig-Brown. Jim named a building after Rod, to keep his memory alive; Rod’s quiet way in the world contrasted with Jim’s ebullient enthusiasm.
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