Tag Archives: Fishing

A story by David Boulding: If you want big fish in UPPER CAMPBELL LAKE, GO TO GEOFF CAMPBELL

Geoff is one of the 11 grandchildren of Wallace Baike and has fond memories of learning to fish with Wallace.

Wallace was one of the loggers involved in the effort to clear cut the valley for the hydro project he knows the bottom of the lake intimately because he was there for years before it was flooded. he spent years telling Geoff about the underwater landscape, where the hills, where the ponds , where the rivers and the valley features were located.

Wallace Bakie

Wallace Bakie

In the old days…1965 to 1985…..Wallace used long skinny shinny gangtrolls with worms and would take a boatload of grandchildren out for an evening. he always caught fish and if the kids were not quiet and suitably appreciative of the experience Wallace would swat the nearest kid and say…..”that is for all of you”

Geoff must have paid attention because not only has he become a big boat person, he now catches the big fish….some say the biggest trout in the lake. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

AGE WAS NO PROBLEM, PENSIONERS CATCH ‘EM

Campbell River Upper Islander, Wednesday, Sept. 25, 1974

Blindness is no handicap, 66-year old Frank Bosco with his catch

Blindness is no handicap, 66-year old Frank Bosco with his catch

Pensioners and retirees comprising a cumuative total of over 1500 years of fishing experience converged on Strathcona Park Lodge Outdoor Education Centre Friday for a weekend of fishing.   Read more

Picture This! (SPL)

Going back a few years for this "Picture This!".  Looks like this person has dinner for the next little while.

Going back a few years for this “Picture This!”. Looks like this person has dinner for the next little while.

Picture This! (SPL)

This photo was taken while sea kayaking toward the Burman River.  One of the advantages of Sea Kayaking is being quiet and able to see nature at its best.  On this particular day seals were fishing for Salmon that were swimming up the near by rivers.

This photo was taken while sea kayaking toward the Burman River. One of the advantages of Sea Kayaking is being quiet and able to see nature at its best. On this particular day seals were fishing for Salmon that were swimming up the near by rivers.

Flash Back Fridays

THE TYEE CAMP AT GOLD RIVER 1961

Jim with a big one!

Jim with a big one!

We had a fishing camp of three tent cabins at the mouth of the Gold River from 1961 until 1964. Every fish that was caught was weighed and counted by Stan Sharcott, a Fish- eries employee. We were leas- ing the land off the nearby Indian band for $300 a year. Our brochure stated at the time: The Department of Fisheries will verify our statement that this is the best place to catch Tyee Salmon (spring salmon) weighing over 30 pounds in the Pacific Northwest. Through our L odge is the only way you can fish this area. The road from Campbell River to Gold River is closed to private cars. We can have you there by boat and bus in one hour and you can return to the comforts of the L odge in the evening or stay at our tent camp to catch the very late and very early fishing. We will look after you there. Food, bedding, boat, guide and tackle are provided. After trout fishing, plan to spend two days in the West Coast/ Gold River area and catch sea run cut-throat and summer steelhead as well as Tyee. Read more

Flashback Fridays

CANOEING STORIES

“Vancouver’s coves and bays yield secrets to canoeists” – 1981

Paddling out to sea, we guided our canoes up and over the rising ocean swells. Behind us, Vancouver Island’s rocky, storm-blown west coast receded in an early morning mist. Ahead lay three surf-beaten isles, where terns and gulls hovered in a constant, diving search for fish and where we, too, planned to catch our breakfast. Beyond these rocky points stretched the vastness of the Pacific, its endlessly rolling waves sweeping all the way to the Orient. For three days we had been exploring by canoe the inlets and fiords of Vancouver Island’s Kyuquot Sound, hidden away at the north western end of the Island, Kyuquot can only be reached by boat or by driving across several hundred miles of hazardous logging roads.  The secluded coves and inlets of the sound were originally the home of the Nootka Indians. Intrepid hunters, they faced the ocean waters in great dugout cedar canoes, travelling long distances to hunt seals, otters and killer whales.

Open ocean canoeing.

Now, in a week-long trip arranged through Strathcona Lodge (located on the Island), we followed their hunting and trading routes in modern fibreglass and aluminum canoes.
Our party of eleven tour members and two guides had first met at Strathcona for a day course in basic canoeing techniques. Paddling across a lake, we practiced forward and backward strokes, the draw and pry strokes, and the ‘J’ stroke for steering, and learned how to prevent disasters with canoe-to-canoe rescues.

 

A mixed group of engineers, business managers, home-makers, teachers and students, few of us had ever canoed before. But the lure of seeing Vancouver Island’s remote west coast in the traditional style of the Indians had appealed to all of us and we worked on our paddling skills until arms and shoulders ached.  That night we met in Strathcona’s Lodge, where our guides, Cliff Redman and Sheila Taylor, unrolled a large chart of the Island’s west coast. On paper, the coast- line was a series of black squiggles and pointed loops dipping sharply in and out of the blue sea.  Read more