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Flash Back Fridays

JERICHO SCHOOL OF THE DEAF: DEAF, TRY SPORTS

Sixty-one students from Vancouver’s Jericho School for the deaf are about to experience sports, fitness, and life in the wild at its best.

Learning how to bake bread at SPL.

Learning how to bake bread at SPL.

The students, some totally deaf, some with only minor hearing impairments, are to be the guests of Strathcona Lodge Outdoor Education Centre from Sept. 29 to Oct. 3.

Under the guidance of eleven of the Lodge’s most qualified instructors, the students will be given lessons in kayaking, canoeing, sailing, and bread baking.

“Because some children born deaf usually have some accompanying physical impairment, only some will be able to take part in over- night camping and back-packing trips,” said the Lodge’s assistant manager Nancy Brown.

Students range in age from eleven to seventeen years, and some have never left the city to experience life in the woods. Some have never camped; some have never been active in sports.

“Just to experience all these things will be great for them,” Brown added.

The five days with the students won’t be all easy going,” says Brown, who explains that the children must be under constant watch. Instructors must also use an interpreter, supplied by the school, to speak to most children. Some children are also suffering poor eyesight, and poor balance. Instructors must treat the students with added care, Brown implied.

Brown explains that Strathcona Lodge is frequently accepting student groups from September until the end of October and has the capacity of sleeping up to 150 youngsters.

Flash Back Fridays

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Inside Flap of Pictures 2

Inside Flap of Pictures copy

Flash Back Fridays

“Wilderness in jeopardy: see it before it’s gone”

By Myrna Boulding, the Campbell River Courier, Thursday, September 25, 1986

The former minister of Lands, Parks and Housing, Jack Kempf, spoke to the Gold River Chamber of Commerce on Sept. 16, not on Strathcona Park as he was originally scheduled to do but on forestry, his new portfolio.

He will make a good forests minister. That is where his heart lies. My con- cern is with parks, particularly Strathcona Park, now in the hands of Austin Pelton along with environment.

Relaxing at Landslide lake after hiking up the Elk River Trail.

Relaxing at Landslide lake after hiking up the Elk River Trail.

If Mr. Pelton has ideas very different from Mr. Kempf it will invalidate much of what I have to say, but I expect consensus within the Social Credit Party has pretty well been established regarding the future of Strathcona Park.

At the 75th birthday celebration of Strathcona Park on Aug. 4, Mr. Kempf promised a detailed review of plans for this park with public hearings to be held in Campbell River and Courtenay sometime this fall.

His stated objective was to make sure of the continued orderly development of our parks system, with a first step toward meeting this goal being to implement the con- clusions of the Wilderness Advisory Committee.

He said that this process was now well under way. The question is, what constitutes orderly development? Read more

Flash Back Fridays

SUE HELLARD AND DOUG PATERSON 1977

Jim Boulding—My Mentor

When I think of Jim Boulding I remember someone who believed in me. His gruff voice saying “You can do it” made me take a big gulp and then just go do it. He was right, I could do it! My confidence started to soar. I found myself running white- water rivers with joy, and leading groups to the west coast on my own. I was filled with an exuberance for life as I did these things! The skills to make this possible were learned at the Lodge so I was confident in the knowledge that I could take on these challenges safely and responsibly.

There were of course memorable moments….Escalante was and is heaven for me, with the beauty and the power of the west coast. I treasure the skills and learning I received from all the resource people who came out on the trips.

Thanks to Hilary Stewart for sharing love and respect for plants and how to use them, cedar especially. I still love to weave baskets every year when we are at Escalante.

Thanks to Ray Williams at Nootka for stories of the trickster of the west coast as we sat in a sweat Lodge. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

STRATHCONA LODGE KICKS OFF SUMMER TEACHING PROGRAM IN WILDERNESS SURVIVAL

July 8, 1975

Strathcona Park Outdoor Education Centre begins its summer teaching program with the first of its whitewater kayak and canoe courses. The Whitewater and West Coast Survival Adventure courses are overbooked, while some vacancies still exist for Basic Wilderness, Wilderness Leadership and West Coast Native Lifestyles.

The groups in residence during the last two weeks of June illustrate the varied nature of Strathcona’s appeal to school groups. A special needs class from Powell River spent one week working on life sports and survival skills. A grade 10 leadership class came to Strathcona all the way from Kamloops MacArthur Park School. Barbara Hargreaves and Ken Purvis designed and ran a program that required only a minimum Lodge staff, while it provided direct challenges in the form of whitewater canoeing, kayaking, rock climbing to the students.

A special two-day anthropology and fishing expedition to Quadra Island was lead by Jim Boulding, the Lodge’s director, and Mike Robinson, the staff anthropologist.

Kitsilano High School sent recent grade twelve graduates to participate in a High School Leadership workshop for ten days in June. Jeff King- ston, the Strathcona mountaineer, led this group on a major climb of a local peak – Mount Thelwood. ‘Alpine to Ocean’ ecological studies were conducted on the climb with the assistance of staff biologist Bob Sutherland

Also in and around the Lodge during June were students from Powell River who have received an ‘Opportunities for Youth’ grant to run a day camp for local youngsters. These teachers-to-be were taught small boat handling, first aid, survival skills, and introductory biology of the coast rainforest.

A small group of outdoor education students participated in a moderately strenuous program called “Senior Citizens Experience” during the last two weeks in June. The program was specially designed to accommodate a wide range of interests and included lake canoeing, whitewater canoe observation from a riverbank, photography, trips to the Gold River waterfront and bog ecology studies.

Flash Back Fridays

THE FIRE: 1973

A story by David Boulding

The Lodge burned down May 23rd, 1973. The fire started after lunch and the building was completely finished by 3 pm. There were few people on property and nothing could be done except save some stuff and prevent other buildings from burning.

Jim, Myrna, and the kids: Jamie, Elizabeth, and Annie were in town. Jim and Myrna raced back to find all they owned burned to the ground. Tears were the common reaction. Jim Boulding’s suspicion that students smoking in the attic room near the crawl space started the fire had a rational basis because the only other possible reason for the fire was faulty wiring and there was no wiring close to the scene. Jim Denis, a contractor from town, was completing some renovations to the kitchen and north wing of the Lodge. I remember there being fewer than 10 people here on the property, although many people driving by stopped and helped.

And some helped themselves to some of the valuables: native baskets and carvings and even an old wagon wheel we saved from the fire.

The chimney after the fire of 1973

The chimney after the fire of 1973

The fire was so hot the Chevron gas station sign, a plastic four foot square sign, melted and buckled high atop a 30 foot steel pole about 50 feet from the building.

I remember Jade Chua from the kitchen being the hero. She was a UBC student from Hong Kong, working to pay for her university expenses. She was about five foot nothing, square-shouldered, and a solid muscular young 20 some- thing woman. Her heroism was visible twice. Some days earlier Jim Denis had taken out the big Garland cooking stove to clean it and make some changes to the gas fittings as the stove was being located farther north in the kitchen. It took four men to move the stove back into the kitchen, and the doorway trim had to be removed, as the stove was wider than the opening. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

PETER CROFT SR. 1970

Jim and I had worked with Peter at ‘Woodlands School’ in Nanaimo when we first started teaching. Later he came to the Lodge with a group of students including his son, Peter Croft Jr., who is now a well-known rock climber. Peter Sr. was an active par- ticipant at the ‘School Trustees Envi- ronmental Workshop’ held at the Lodge in 1975.

Peter Croft Sr.

Peter Croft Sr.

Peter tells this story:

The rain was relentless and a gusty wind was boxing the compass. 28 Grade Nine students were divided into pairs and scattered among the trees. They were learning ‘How to survive in a British Columbia rain forest’. Each pair was given a can of cold chicken soup. The task was to light a fire, heat the soup and drink it.

Read more

Flash Back Fridays

LAND FOR A BOY’S CAMP 1959

Jim was trying to get land for a boy’s camp from Mr. Dickenson, the Chief Executive Officer of the East Asiatic Company. This company owned most of the timberlands that now belong to TimberWest. According to Jim, Mr. Dickenson was going to help him; however, my dad, Wallace Baikie, said that if Jim wanted a site so badly he would subdivide the acreage that he had received from B.C. Hydro in exchange for the land that had been flooded during the power development. The brothers, Harper and Wallace, had al- ready divided this strip of land between them and my dad had the southern end. It was the end with the somewhat derelict Strathcona Lodge on it. With the help of his friend, the surveyor Gordon Wagner, they subdivided the landalong the lake into about forty lots, most with about 100 feet of frontage and the Lodge on a piece with 300 feet on Upper Campbell Lake. The properties were offered to all of my dad’s former employees, as well as relatives and friends. It was a great deal; $100 per 100 feet a year for nine years and then a bit more on the tenth year and it was yours. My uncle Harper did a similar thing with the land that he had along the lake.

Dave Campbell, Jim Boulding & Ron Leversage

Dave Campbell, Jim Boulding & Ron Leversage

Read more

Flash Back Fridays

MICHEAL REWALD: REWALDO

A story by David Boulding

Rewaldo with his usual big smile

Rewaldo with his usual big smile

Michael Rewald was Jim’s favourite. He was so respected that some years after Mike left, and was running a development project in Papua New Guinea, Jim phoned in desperation because he could not fix the water system without Mike’s advice. Jim bellowed over the radiophone all the way to the South Pacific: “Mike? You know that line you put in from 14 over past the tee joint that runs down hill? Yeah. Yeah. That one. Where does the line go? Over to Nancy’s or straight down to one or over to Gurney’s?” Read more

Flash Back Fridays

CAROL PRATT AND CLIFF REDMAN – 1980

In Ontario schools these days, “character education” is one of our “big ideas” (love those buss terms: and “Environment” is something you look up on the Internet). I can just see JB flipping through the curriculum binder and laughing: “what are ya, a bunch of wimps?” That’s what he’d say, and rightfully so.

Strathcona Poem

You build character getting yourself – and others- up Elk Horn, King’s Peak, Auger Point, Flower Ridge

Y ou build character cooking for a hoard of ravenous outdoor enthusiasts
You build character sitting at a plank desk in the eco-cabin, with a giant wolfspider on the loose, and your last candle puddling out

You build character digesting Logan Bread
You build character running for miles along a mountain road, wary ofbears, Raven somersaulting overhead

You build character paddling alone down the lake because you like your own quite company Read more