Flash Back Fridays

FURNISHING THE OLD LODGE

I bought brass beds and big leather chairs from the Bickle estate in Cumberland. Mrs. Fearing, Judy Forberg’s grandmother (see below) made me hooked rag rugs for all seven bedrooms, plus a five by seven foot rug, beautifully crafted out of our old woolen clothing and featuring a large multi-colored fish. I hung this masterpiece in the main living room over the opening between the two bedrooms that shared a hallway and bathroom.  The fish theme extended to tracings of the largest trout outlined on the doors. I also purchased patch-work quilts and home-made comforters. We bought log tables and chairs as well as sets of drawers for the cabins from a place on southern Vancouver Island. Jim worked with a French Canadian craftsman to make chairs and stools out of cedar stumps, which we upholstered. I refinished every piece of oak furniture that I could find at second hand stores. All one winter I had furniture in the second bathroom of our rental apartment in town that I was scrapping and sanding. Oak was quite reasonable to buy at the time because it was out of style but most pieces needed work. Our lamps were made of carved wooden fish floats. The old log Lodge was put together so each cedar log was carved to fit the one below it and intricate corners that fit together perfectly. If it had not been built in this way, it would have been almost impossible to move it in one piece like my dad was able to. Once the old Lodge was cleaned up and decorated, it was truly beautiful. It was the first building that we had ever owned and I guess in some ways we considered it our home rather than a place of business.

Interior of the Lodge

Interior of the Lodge

JACK BOULDING 1960

One of our first staff was Jack Boulding. Jim’s brother was six years younger than he was, and a keen hiker, having belonged to the Varsity Outdoor Club at UBC. We paid him a percentage, I think it was ten percent of our gross, which turned out to be more than we made. Apparently, he also worked nights for my dad, Wallace Baikie. In spite of being tired, he worked hard and had our best interests at heart. Jack traveled to England later that year and met his wife Pam. In 1964 Jack and Pam returned to the Lodge for a short time with their small baby Rachel. Making baby formula took up most of Jack’s time on this visit. Many years later (around 1984) Rachel returned to help look after my two youngest children, Nick and Josie. Rachel is now a psychiatrist.

View to the south from the Lodge

View to the south from the Lodge

BILL HARRISON 1960

Jim invited Bill Harrison and Rollie Finness, fellow school teachers, to spend the weekend at the Lodge. As was Jim’s way, he put them to work. After school on a Friday in September, Jim tied three motor boats together and set off with the two others to pick up cedar shake bolts (later split by hand to make cedar roof shakes) across the lake from the Lodge. By the time they had loaded the three boats it was fairly dark. Jim pointed out a small light (Bill said that it looked like about 60 watts) and told them to head in that direction. Bill was not a water person and was very frightened. The lake was relatively calm but Bill’s boat was a half hour behind the other two as he did not want to throttle up the boat. Bill said that Jim had a habit of inviting beginner teachers up to the Lodge on weekends and putting them to work. They did stay for the weekend so I guess it couldn’t have been too bad.