Tag Archives: Myrna Boulding

Flash Back Fridays

UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA (UBC) 1953

Myrna & Jim on a date

Myrna & Jim on a date

When I was 18 and in my second year at university, my future husband picked me out of a meal lineup at UBC. I was taking an accounting course to prepare myself to go into Commerce. There were a total of 152 girls staying at the women’s dormitories that summer, and no men.
We had meals at the nearby Fort Camp dining hall. Three guys came for a brief period that summer to write exams. Jim later said that he picked me to pursue because I had good legs and a nice ass. His older brother Joe, who was a doctor, had told him that was what to look for in a woman.
Jim had been working as a hard rock driller on the pipeline and was at UBC briefly to write a supplemental exam in English 200. I was not too taken with him. I was going out with a PhD candidate in physics and my main interest was horses. I had been a successful competitive English rider and jumper, winning many top prizes in B.C. I had even taken my best horse to Vancouver when I went to UBC. Jim was persistent. I finally went on a date with him. Later I told my cousin, Bill Baikie, that he was all brawn and no brain. Bill insisted that I not give up on him, that he really did have some depth. Actually Bill and many others treated Jim like a hero because he was a famous UBC football player. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

HOW I ENDED UP AT STRATHCONA PARK LODGE

Growing up in Comox, Vancouver Island, in the 1940s and early 1950s, I had an idyllic childhood. Comox had many British expatriates in a town of 1000. There were only 50 young people from grade eight to grade twelve in the Comox High School, and the school did not have a gymnasium. There were no television sets, so most young people spent their free time outside. My friends and I rode our horses for miles in every possible direction.

Myrna, age 4, with Nancy (Thompson) Brown

Myrna, age 4, with Nancy (Thompson) Brown

As long as we were home for meals we could go wherever we wanted. When the British couple Lieutenant Colonel Jack Thorne and his wife Josephte moved to Comox I began to train for competitive riding. The Colonel, as we called him, knew a lot about training horses and riders. In addition, he was a marvelous horseperson and story teller. I did well in the shows, winning trophies in jumping, hunter-hack and equitation events. I also learned a lot about how to feed horses and get them fit for jumping and other events. My interest in human nutrition and fitness is rooted in these early activities. I would go to almost any length to win. Every possible morning I would get up before school and exercise my horses. If it was winter, I rode on the sandy beaches in Comox. Perhaps this toughened me and is the reason why I continued to try hard when the Lodge seemed like a hopeless proposition.
My father, Wallace Baikie, was of Scottish ancestry and although generous with me, had some frugal habits. Born in 1902, he had been a young man during the depression. He had been in the logging and lumber business and knew how to work hard. Read more

Flash Back Fridays

HORSES

Maria McLeish on Reecy

Maria McLeish on Reecy

My horse called Reecy, ‘My Recompense’, was a former race horse given to me by Maggie Rogers when she went off to McGill University. Jim had a big, rather opinionated horse called Stewball who looked something like the horses that the Mounties rode. Jim could shoot a gun off Stewball, and did during a short period when he worked at the Lodge as a Class A hunting guide.

We bought Empress, a Welsh pony, in 1968 for Liz. When Liz was about eight, she remembers riding Empress up the mountain with her father. The saddle kept slipping and Jim would have to get off and tighten the girth. It was almost too steep for the pony.

Some years later when we got our own place on McPhedran Road in Campbell River, Jim Denis, a local contractor, built us a barn for the horses. Jamie would often feed the horses because he was younger than his two sisters and they were too busy getting ready for school. Liz had Duchess, a somewhat spooky Anglo/ Arab and Annie had Sym- phony, an Arabian, who was later sold to Barb Phipps in Campbell River. Read more