Flash Back Fridays

FRIENDS WORLD COLLEGE 1972/73

Friends World College, on boat to Nootka Island, October 1972 had decided that he Mary, Nikki, Michael, Joan, Bergie, Mark (top row) Ken, Mary, Johnny Cake (bottom row)

Friends World College, on boat to Nootka Island, October 1972 had decided that he Mary, Nikki, Michael, Joan, Bergie, Mark (top row) Ken, Mary, Johnny Cake (bottom row)

In 1972, Peter Wright took a sabbatical in order to start a branch of Friends World College, a Quaker College from New York. Peter arrived at the Lodge a few weeks early to prepare for the arrival of the students. I was attracted to Peter’s great intellect; he was one of the most knowledgeable men I ever met. Jim loved his practical application of his worldwide learning to local problems. The second professor at the college, Ken Power, had been looking for an alternative to teaching under structured educational methods. Ken had done undergraduate and post-graduate work in sociology, anthropology and economics at the universities of Windsor , Toronto and Alberta and had enough of structured educational methods. By chance he had written to John Young, a high school principal in Campbell River at the time, who told him about Peter Wright and Friends World College

The undergraduates were to spend the fall and spring living in our new building, ever since called the College building, on the south side of Lodge property. After they arrived, the students had a six-week orientation and then with Peter and Ken would negotiate a topic, a time, an evaluation method, and how the work would be done. The students then roared into action studying the agreed upon topic, such things as wolves in North America, outdoor education, new building techniques and methods of generating and saving power. One student, Mark Hurwitz, built a Buckminster Fuller style geodesic dome, which is still at the Lodge. He lived there with Nikki Ellman. Mary Shed, another student, spent the winter gathering elk droppings, in order to find out what they ate. She later became a wildlife biologist. Some students built canvas kayaks and many participated in creating a large vegetable garden. They lived together, sharing food, books and sleeping quarters.  Read more