Tag Archives: Strathcona Park Lodge

Flash Back Fridays

AVIS WALTON 1968

The following was written for the Daily Colonist. Avis Walton and Jack Phillips met at the Lodge in its new location.

Cedar logs were selected from trees of a uniform size, felled in the early spring during the sap running season (to maintain a clear amber color throughout) and then peeled, oiled, “V” grooved horizontally, and held together with two- foot drift bolts. Corners were notched and interlocked, grooves were slashed in every door and window setting, braces were inserted and hidden by frames. The mellow lounge has a four-square pitched ceiling, dramatized and strengthened by open beams that are criss-crossed like the lines of the Union Jack, to throw fascinating firelight shadows. A massive wrought-iron hook holds a lamp and centers on the crosses, going right through the ridge pole to the roof.

Guests enjoying the fire at Strathcona Lodge at its original location

Guests enjoying the fire at Strathcona Lodge at its original location.

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This is Pat one of our staff members enjoying the great outdoor of Strathcona Provincial Park.

This is Pat, he’s one of our  guides/outdoor educators members the great outdoors of Strathcona Provincial Park.

Picture This! (WYLD)

#takemetothesummit.  WYLD campers reached the summit of a couple mountains this summer.

#takemetothesummit. WYLD campers reached the summit of a couple mountains this summer.

Picture This! (SPL)

2013 was a great year for kayak soccer.  Come join us in 2014 during the months of July and August and play some kayak soccer!

2013 was a great year for kayak soccer. Come join us in 2014 during the months of July and August and play some kayak soccer!

Flash Back Fridays

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1.Sea Otters are one of the few animals that use tools. They mainly use rocks, but have been seen using glass soda bottles and cement blocks. 2.	Newborn pups cannot sink or dive. 3.	Sea Otters have built in pockets under their arms. 4.	A group of Sea Otters resting together is called a raft. 5.	Sea Otters are the only marine mammal without a layer of blubber (fat). 6.	Sea Otters’ fur has 10x # of hairs per square inch than we have on our entire head. (humans 100,000; otters 1,000,000) 7.	Sea Otters’ teeth are strong enough to bite through the spines of a sea urchin, or crunch a clam shell open. 8.	Wild adult Sea Otters eat 25% or more of their body weight a day, or more than 12 pounds of seafood. A 150 lb human would need to eat 37 lbs of food a day! 9.	Sea Otters’ diets can consist of: crabs, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, sea urchins, octopus, squid, snails, sea stars, and fat innkeeper worms. 10.	Sea Otters’ only marine predators are humans, great white sharks, and killer whales.

1. Sea Otters are one of the few animals that use tools. They mainly use rocks, but have been seen using glass soda bottles and cement blocks.
2. Newborn pups cannot sink or dive.
3. Sea Otters have built in pockets under their arms.
4. A group of Sea Otters resting together is called a raft.
5. Sea Otters are the only marine mammal without a layer of blubber (fat).
6. Sea Otters’ fur has 10x # of hairs per square inch than we have on our entire head. (humans 100,000; otters 1,000,000)
7. Sea Otters’ teeth are strong enough to bite through the spines of a sea urchin, or crunch a clam shell open.
8. Wild adult Sea Otters eat 25% or more of their body weight a day, or more than 12 pounds of seafood. A 150 lb human would need to eat 37 lbs of food a day!
9. Sea Otters’ diets can consist of: crabs, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, sea urchins, octopus, squid, snails, sea stars, and fat innkeeper worms.
10. Sea Otters’ only marine predators are humans, great white sharks, and killer whales.

Flash Back Fridays

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Seals are probably the most common type of animal you will see on any sea kayak trip on the West Coast of Canada.  On this particular day they were playing around in the current on the North side of Quadra Island.

Seals are probably the most common type of animal you will see on any sea kayak trip on the West Coast of Canada. On this particular day they were playing around in the current on the North side of Quadra Island.

Flash Back Fridays

JERICHO SCHOOL OF THE DEAF: DEAF, TRY SPORTS

Sixty-one students from Vancouver’s Jericho School for the deaf are about to experience sports, fitness, and life in the wild at its best.

Learning how to bake bread at SPL.

Learning how to bake bread at SPL.

The students, some totally deaf, some with only minor hearing impairments, are to be the guests of Strathcona Lodge Outdoor Education Centre from Sept. 29 to Oct. 3.

Under the guidance of eleven of the Lodge’s most qualified instructors, the students will be given lessons in kayaking, canoeing, sailing, and bread baking.

“Because some children born deaf usually have some accompanying physical impairment, only some will be able to take part in over- night camping and back-packing trips,” said the Lodge’s assistant manager Nancy Brown.

Students range in age from eleven to seventeen years, and some have never left the city to experience life in the woods. Some have never camped; some have never been active in sports.

“Just to experience all these things will be great for them,” Brown added.

The five days with the students won’t be all easy going,” says Brown, who explains that the children must be under constant watch. Instructors must also use an interpreter, supplied by the school, to speak to most children. Some children are also suffering poor eyesight, and poor balance. Instructors must treat the students with added care, Brown implied.

Brown explains that Strathcona Lodge is frequently accepting student groups from September until the end of October and has the capacity of sleeping up to 150 youngsters.

Picture This! (SPL)

The night sky at Strathcona Park Lodge is gorgeous with no city light pollution to disturb the view.

The night sky at Strathcona Park Lodge is gorgeous with no city light pollution to disturb the view.